Mid-latitude Cyclones

By | 9 Aug 2013

Mid-latitude Cyclones

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General characteristics

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Time-lapse photography of a passing Cold Front

An introduction to Air Masses

Areas where mid-latitude cyclones form

PolarFronts

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Conditions necessary for their formation

Frontal Systems explained – Northern Hemisphere

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Cold Fronts

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Warn Fronts

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MLCWarmCalodSectorSOURCE: http://www.thutong.doe.gov.za/

Cross section of a Mid-latitude Cyclone
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Cold Fronts

Stages of development and related weather conditions

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Warm Front Occlusion (The cold front is rising above the warm front)
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Cold Front Occlusion (The warm front is rising above the cold front)
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synoptic-chart-13-march-2012-occlusion Merged

Weather patterns associated with cold, warm, and occluded fronts

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SOURCE: 
MLCWeatherhttp://www.thutong.doe.gov.za/

Reading and interpreting satellite images and synoptic weather maps

FamilyOfFronts Merged

FamilyFrontsOcclusion Merged

 

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4 thoughts on “Mid-latitude Cyclones

  1. sikheto lawrence

    I’m a first teacher at grade 12 with Geography. how can i see if there are low pressure in cyclone?

    1. Eugene Brown Post author

      HI Sikheto, thank you for your question. All cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere are low pressures. The air around a cyclone (low pressure) moves into the low pressure in a clockwise direction. Air moves out of an anti-cyclone (high pressure) in an anticlockwise direction.

  2. kaashiefah

    Hi where can i get notes, the videos are awesome but would like it in some writing though. Can you maybe help me please

    1. Eugene Brown Post author

      Hi, unfortunately, the only information available is the information you see on the site.

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